Frenchman's Bay, Maine

Frenchman's Bay, Maine

Monday, September 17, 2007

Thoughts On Hebrews Eleven

I've been mulling over Hebrews 11 lately. Recently, I submitted a poetry collection entitled "A Stranger On Earth" to a children's publishing house and I'm waiting for their reply. The poems are about the country of Burundi and its people, and about my experiences growing up there. Here's where the title of my collection comes from:

11By faith Abraham, even though he was past age—and Sarah herself was barren—was enabled to become a father because he considered him faithful who had made the promise. 12And so from this one man, and he as good as dead, came descendants as numerous as the stars in the sky and as countless as the sand on the seashore.
13All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance. And they admitted that they were aliens and strangers on earth.

14People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own.
--Hebrews 11: 11-14

I think part of the reason this passage speaks so strongly to me is due to my upbringing as a "Third Culture Kid." Home is important to me--but where's my real home? In Africa, where I spent most of my first ten years, a year in high school, and a summer in college ? Or in Oregon, where we moved next? It took quite a long time (into my thirties) for me to begin to feel truly American. At the core, I was still a mix. Anyway, you get the picture.

Now, we're in Germany, and Oregon feels like home. What a crazy mixed-up world...

8 comments:

Ginger said...

Wow. I can relate so completely! I've been here 26 years now, and I still find myself saying, "these Americans..." I think I'll always be that stranger and alien. But then I think believing in God does that to you, as well.

Betsy said...

I never feel more American than when I'm living overseas...

And when I'm in the US I feel like a National Geographic reporter who is sent to an exotic locale to report on a foreign culture... ;-)

Laura said...

OH I am sure with you on this one....

Signed,
Stranger in a strange land. ;)

don't eat alone said...

I live these feelings as well.

Peace,
Milton

Ruth said...

I would love to see your collection of poetry. Even though I was born overseas, I have always identified with being a Canadian. But my family is scattered all over and we are citizens of the world (for now!) I feel privileged to have had exposure to many cultures.

Hmmm...my word verification is bbc skit.

anno said...

jThis post really connected with me. I've been back in the States for years now, but I've never felt completely American.

Your poems sound lovely. Good luck with your submission.

andsewitis Holly said...

I do get the picture. I was thinking along the lines of "where's home?" today. I have come to the conclusion that I don't feel like I *belong* anywhere and yet I can get along anywhere. That whole TCK stuff. Yah, know it well.

Africakid said...

Thanks for all your comments!

I did want to add -- despite my feelings of not being entirely at home in any one country, I'm so glad to have been raised overseas for the first part of my life. That exposure to other cultures and to all types of people is a gift I'd never trade.